Jasmine Sierra Dang

Jasmine Sierra Dang

Jasmine Sierra Dang

Graduate Research Assistant

Vigilance Tasks, Wearable Interfaces, Driving, and Human-Computer Interaction

Jasmine S. Dang is currently a Psychology Ph.D. candidate in the Human Factors and Applied Cognition (HFAC) program at George Mason University (GMU). She received her B.S. in Psychology with a minor in Neuroscience and a concentration in Human Factors at GMU in 2017. Subsequently, she received her M.A. from the HFAC program at GMU in 2019. Her research background focuses on vigilance and sustained attention. She studies human performance and subjective measures such as mind-wandering in tasks which involve target detection and automated aid cues. In 2018, she was a Repperger Intern of the 711th Human Performance Wing at the U.S. Air Force Research Lab (AFRL) based at Wright-Patterson Air Force Base near Dayton, Ohio, where she worked on human-robotic trust studies. In 2019, she was an NREIP intern working on vigilance study data for the Laboratory for Autonomous Systems Research (LASR) at the U.S. Naval Research Laboratory (NRL). Since 2019, she has been working as a Research Assistant at the U.S. Army CCDC C5ISR Center Night Vision and Electronics Sensors Directorate (NVESD) employed by Planned System International, Inc.

Selected Publications

Wilson, K. M., Joux, N. R., Head, J. R., Helton, W. S., Dang, J. S., & Weakley, J. J. (2018). Presenting objective visual performance feedback over multiple sets of resistance exercise improves motivation, competitiveness, and performance. Proceedings of the Human Factors and Ergonomics Society Annual Meeting, 62(1), 1306-1310. doi:10.1177/1541931218621299

Dang, J. S., Figueroa, I. J., & Helton, W. S. (2018). You are measuring the decision to be fast, not inattention: The Sustained Attention to Response Task does not measure sustained attention. Experimental Brain Research 236(6). doi:10.1007/s00221-018-5291-6.

Dang, J. S., Figueroa, I. J., & Helton, W. S. (2017). Determining Practice Effects on a Cognitive Flexibility Assessment. Proceedings of the Human Factors and Ergonomics Society Annual Meeting, 61(1), 1829-1833. doi:10.1177/1541931213601938

Courses Taught

PSYC 300 - Statistics in Psychology

PSYC 301 - Research Methods in Psychology

Recent Presentations

Greenwood, P., Waltrip, M., Dang, J. S., Tulk, S., Baldwin, C., Lenneman, J. (2018). Information Used in Mental Model Formation of Advanced Driver Assistance Systems. Poster presentation at Automated Vehicles Symposium. San Francisco, CA.

Greenwood, P., Baldwin, C., McKendrick, B., Cisler, D., Chong, S., & Dang, J. S. (2017). Automation Transparency to Promote Appropriate Trust Calibration. Poster presentation at the APA’s Technology, Mind, and Society Conference. Washington, DC.

Greenwood, P., Baldwin, C., McKendrick, B., Cisler, D., Chong, S., & Dang, J. S. (2017). Physiological Predictors of Speed of Detecting Automation Failures during Autonomous Driving. Poster presentation at the APA’s Technology, Mind, and Society Conference. Washington, DC. 

Dang, J. S. (2017). Data Blitz. Organized by the Measurement, Research methodology, Evaluation, and Statistics Research Group. Fairfax, VA. 

Dang, J. S., Figueroa, I. J., and Helton, W. S. (2017). Determining practice effects on a cognitive flexibility assessment tool. Lecture presentation at the Human Factors and Ergonomics Society Annual Meeting. Austin, TX.

Dang, J. S., Figueroa, I. J., and Helton, W. S. (2017). Predicting “Oops” errors: Individual differences in cognitive flexibility predict performance in a Sustained Attention to Response Task. 

  1. Poster present at the National Conference of Undergraduate Research. University of Memphis,TN.
  2. Poster present at the CHSS Undergraduate Research Symposium. George Mason University,VA.
  3. Poster present at the Sixth OSCAR Annual Celebrations of Student Scholarship. George Mason University, VA. 
  4. Poster present at the College of Humanities and Social Sciences Undergraduate Research Symposium. George Mason University, VA.