Patrick P. Weis

Patrick P. Weis

Patrick P. Weis

Graduate Research Assistant

embodied cognition, human-technology-interfaces, predictive coding

Patrick Weis is a third year doctoral student working with Dr. Eva Wiese in the Social and Cognitive Interactions Lab. His research interests include psychophysiology, improving human-technology-interfaces, and embodied cognition. Patrick received a B.Sc. in Psychology from Otto-von-Guericke-University Magdeburg, Germany. He also received a M.Sc. in Neural and Behavioural Sciences from the International Max Planck Research School of Neural and Behavioural Sciences and the University of Tuebingen, Germany. He worked with labs in the fields of multimodal integration, sleep-dependent memory consolidation, early vision, language processing, and human-computer-interaction. During that work he enjoyed employing diverse methods including ECG, EDA measurement, EEG, Eye-Tracking, fEMG, Psychophysics, Wrist Acceleration Measurement, and EMS.

Selected Publications

Weis, P. P., & Wiese, E. (under review). Good memory, less technology: strong memory traces decrease reliance on external information. In Proceedings of the ACM Technology, Mind, and Society Meeting.
Weis, P. P., & Wiese, E. (under review). Beliefs about system reliability determine externalization rate in human computer interaction. In Proceedings of the ACM Technology, Mind, and Society Meeting.   
Wiese, E., Weis, P. P., & Lofaro, D. (under review). Embodied social robots trigger gaze following in real-time. In Proceedings of the ACM Technology, Mind, and Society Meeting.    
Weis, P. P., & Wiese, E. (2017). Cognitive conflict as possible origin of the uncanny valley. In Proceedings of the Human Factors and Ergonomics Society Annual Meeting (Vol. 61, No. 1, pp. 1599-1603). Los Angeles, CA: SAGE Publications.
Weis, P. P., & Herbert, C. (2017). Bodily Reactions to Emotional Words Referring to Own versus Other People’s Emotions. Frontiers in Psychology, 8, 1277.
Feld, G. B., Weis, P. P., & Born, J. (2016). The limited capacity of sleep-dependent memory consolidation. Frontiers in psychology, 7, 1368.

Grants and Fellowships

George Mason Presidential Scholar

Alumni of the German Academic Foundation

Recent Presentations

Weis, P. P., & Wiese, E. (2017). Cognitive Conflict as Possible Origin of the Uncanny Valley. Presentation given at the Human Factors and Ergonomics Society Annual Meeting. Austin, TX.

Weis, P. P. (2017). Using objects in the external world to help us think. Presentation given at the Weekly Brown Bag Talks of George Mason University’s Human Factors Program. Fairfax, VA.

Weis, P. P. (2016, April). How Quick Is Your Mind? Comparing the Speed of Internal and External  Cognizing. Presentation given at the Annual Data Blitz Meeting for the laboratory of Measurement, Research Methodology, Evaluation, and Statistics. Fairfax, VA.